Carnival + Afro-Diasporic

On this page:

::: Dancehall  ::: 

::: Soca :::

::: Kuduro/Kuduru :::

 

9780776607368

 

::: Dancehall :::

 

Bakare-Yusuf, Bibi “Fabricating Identities: Survival and the Imagination in Jamaican Dancehall Culture” Fashion Theory: The Journal of Dress, Body & Culture, Volume 10, Number 4, December 2006, pp. 461-483(23) 

Basu, Dipannita & Werbner, Pnina “Bootstrap capitalism and the culture industries: a critique of invidious comparisons in the study of ethnic entrepreneurship” Ethnic & Racial Studies Volume 24, Issue 2, 2001 pages 236-262 

Chude-Sokei, Louis “Post-Nationalist Geographies: Rasta, Ragga, and Reinventing Africa” African Arts Vol. 27, No. 4 (Autumn, 1994), pp. 80-84+96 

Cooper, Carolyn “Sound Clash: Jamaican Dancehall Culture at Large” 2006 

Frank, Kevin “Female Agency and Oppression in Caribbean Bacchanalian Culture: Soca, Carnival, and Dancehall”Women’s Studies Quarterly

Hope, Donna “The British link-up crew: Consumption Masquerading as Masculinity in the Dancehall” Interventions Volume 6, Issue 1, 2004 pages 101-117 

Laemmli, Kiley E. “Culture as Commodity: Dancehall Queens and the Sale of Female Empowerment” 

Manuel, Peter and Wayne Marshall. “The Riddim Method : Aesthetics, Practice, and Ownership in Jamaican Dancehall.” Popular Music 25, no. 3 (2006): 447-470.

Marshall, Wayne “Bling-bling for Rastafari?” (dissertation excerpt)

Meredith, Sharon “Governing Sound: The Cultural Politics of Trinidad’s Carnival Musics” pages 283-285 Ethnomusicology Forum Volume 18, Issue 2, 2009 

NELSON, CAMILLE A. “LYRICAL ASSAULT: DANCEHALL VERSUS THE CULTURAL IMPERIALISM OF THE NORTH-WEST” Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal Vol. 17:231 

Partridge, Christopher. 2010. Dub in Babylon. London: Equinox.

Pinnock, Agostinho M.N. “A Ghetto Education Is Basic”: (Jamaican) Dancehall Masculinities As Counter-Culture” The Journal of Pan African Studies, vol.1, no.9, August 2007 

Saunders, Patricia J. “Is Not Everything Good to Eat, Good to Talk: Sexual Economy and Dancehall Music in the Global Marketplace” Small Axe Number 13 (Volume 7, Number 1), March 2003 

 STANLEY, SONJA NIAH ‘Dis Slackness Ting’: A Dichotomizing Master Narrative in Jamaican Dancehall Caribbean Quarterly Vol. 51, No. 3/4, Cultural Studies: A New Generation of Scholars (Sept-Dec. 2005), pp. 55-76 

Stanley Niaah, Sonjah. “DanceHall: From Slave Ship to Ghetto”. University of Ottawa Press.

Stolzoff, Norman. “Wake the Town and Tell the People: Dancehall Culture in Jamaica”. Duke University Press.

Veal, Michael. “Dub: Soundscapes and Shattered Songs in Jamaican Reggae”. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press.

Zips, Werner “There ain’t just Black in the Atlantic, Jack! Transformations of Masculinity from the Outlaw to the Rebel in Dancehall Reggae” Volume! 2011/2 (8:2)

 

978-0-8223-2514-7_pr

 

 

::: Soca :::

 

Chude-Sokei, Louis “Post-Nationalist Geographies: Rasta, Ragga, and Reinventing Africa” African Arts Vol. 27, No. 4 (Autumn, 1994), pp. 80-84+96 

Frank, Kevin “Female Agency and Oppression in Caribbean Bacchanalian Culture: Soca, Carnival, and Dancehall”Women’s Studies Quarterly

Harewood, Susan “TRANSNATIONAL SOCA PERFORMANCES, GENDERED RE-NARRATIONS OF CARIBBEAN NATIONALISM” Social and Economic Studies

LEUNG, GLENDA ALICIA E. “Negotiation of Trinidadian identity in ragga soca music” World Englishes Volume 28, Issue 4, pages 509–531, December 2009  

McParland, Robert “Governing Sound: The Cultural Politics of Trinidad’s Carnival Musics” Popular Music and Society 32:2 2009 pages 295-297

 Pinto, Samantha “Why Must All Girls Want to be Flag Women?”: Postcolonial Sexualities, National Reception, and Caribbean Soca Performance” Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism Volume 10, Number 1, 2009  pp. 137-163 

 

 

::: Kuduro/Kuduru :::

 

Marcon, Frank Nilton “Identity and style in Lisbon: Kuduro, youth and African immigration” Cadernos de Estudos Africanos no.24 Lisboa jul./dez. 2012 pdf (in portugese)

Moorman, Marissa J. “Anatomy of Kuduro: Articulating the Angolan Body Politic after the War” African Studies Review Vol 57 / Iss 03 / Dec 2014, pp 21-40 

Sheridan, Garth “Fruity Batidas: The Technologies and Aesthetics of Kuduro” Dancecult Vol 6, No 1 (2014) 

Szczepanek, Jacek «Producing Music Is a Privilege» Norient 3 March 2014 

Tomás, António “Becoming famous: kuduro, politics and the performance of social visibility” Critical Interventions: Journal of African Art History and Visual Culture 8:2 2014 pages 261-275

Tomás, António “Harnessing the energia of kuduro and its infrastructure of circulation”

Santos, Ana “NURTURING CREATIVE INDUSTRIES IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD: THE CASE OF ALTERNATIVE SYSTEMS OF MUSIC PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION” Michigan State University Journal of International Law 2013 601

Young, Hershini “Sound of Kuduro knocking at my door”: Kuduro Dance and the Poetics of Debility” African American Review Vol 45, No. 3, Fall 2012 pp. 391-402 

Alisch & Siegert “Angolanidade revisited – Kuduro” Norient 6 June 2011

Seddon, Portia “MP3 Blogging and the Urban Soundscape” Norient 23 May 2012

Moehn, F. “Kuduro meets Tecno-Brega” Norient 9 July 2013

Rocha, C. “Global Ghettotech” Norient 13 June 2009

 

 

“I Love Kuduro”

“Kuduro Cultura” 2014

 

 

Advertisements